Growing Up With Media

Discovering How Technology Impacts Public Health

Growing Up With Media

Overview:

Existing literature suggests linkages between violence in television and games and aggressive behavior.  Less is known about how this extends to new media, especially the Internet; and also whether this extends beyond aggressive attitudes and behaviors to more serious forms of violence.  The Growing up with Media study is a longitudinal survey of almost 1600 youth between the ages of 10 and 15 years and their caregivers.  Participants were randomly recruited from the Harris Panel OnLine (HPOL).  Youth and parents were surveyed once a year for three years (also referred to as waves) from 2006-2008.  The resulting data provides a look into how exposure to violent media is related to externalizing behaviors, including seriously violent behavior, over time.  They also provide national estimates of online experiences, including cyberbullying and unwanted sexual experiences.  This project was conducted in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Data were collected by Harris Interactive.

The Growing up with Media study was extended for another three waves in 2010.  Sexual violence is a significant public health issue.  The National Institutes of Justice estimate that over one million people are victims of rape and sexual assault each year, resulting in an annual $127 billion in associated victim costs.  Adult domestic violence is estimated to affect 2.3 million victims and cost an additional $67 billion per year.  Little is known about how sexual violence perpetration develops, but it seems to emerge during youth.  Findings from these data, collected in 2010, 2011, and 2012 from the same children and caregivers who were in the original study, provide a rich resource of information about how violence emerges.  Data will provide clues for things we might target in intervention and prevention projects to reduce the likelihood of violent behavior in adolescence.  Data were collected by Harris Interactive.